Using Grids In Photoshop And Photoshop Elements

February 23, 2015

Using Grids In Photoshop And Photoshop Elements

The grid feature in Photoshop and Photoshop Elements is an easy-to-use and useful tool that can help with cropping and straightening photos, as well as arranging, aligning and positioning layers within your image.

When enabled, the grid view overlays a crisscross of lines on top of your photo. This mesh pattern is easy to customize—you can change the spacing of the lines as well as the line style and color—so the grid layout can be tailored to your specific needs. And adding the Snap To Grid option allows you to align objects exactly along the gridlines as well as create precise edges when drawing selections, cropping boxes or outlines for shapes and paths.

Enable Grid View

To enable the grid view in Photoshop, choose View>Show>Grid from the top menu bar.

Using Grids In Photoshop

You can also use the keyboard shortcut Command+’ (on a Mac) or Ctrl+’ (on a PC).

To turn on the grid when working in Photoshop Elements, choose View>Grid from the top menu bar.

Using Grids In Photoshop

You can also use the keyboard shortcut Command+’ (on a Mac) or Ctrl+’ (on a PC) to enable Grid View.

Once the Grid view has been enabled, you will see a grid pattern superimposed on your image. The lines of the grid are non-printing. They are just there to act as a guide when working on your image.

Using Grids In Photoshop

Customize Grid View

Once you have turned on grid view, you can adjust its settings to tailor the layout to your liking. To set the grid preferences, first open the Preferences dialog box by doing one of the following:

In Photoshop:
    • On a Mac, choose Photoshop > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices from the top menu bar.
Using Grids In Photoshop
  • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid, & Slices from the menu bar.
In Photoshop Elements:
    • On a Mac, choose Photoshop Elements Editor > Preferences > Guides & Grid from the top menu bar.
Using Grids In Photoshop
  • In Windows, choose Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid from the menu bar.

Then, when the Preferences dialog box opens, you will see a section for the Grid settings.

Using Grids In Photoshop

There you can adjust:

  • The Gridline Spacing.This parameter (labeled Gridline Every) controls the distant between the main grid lines. You can change both the line spacing the unit of measurement..
  • Subdivisions.Here, you can set how many subdivisions will appear between each main grid line.
  • The Gridline Color.You can set the color for the lines of the grid pattern. Visually, it's easier to work with a grid that is colored in a hue that doesn't appear in your photo because it stands out. So if you are working an image that shows a nighttime scene, you may want to change your grid color to white, magenta or cyan.
  • The Line Style Color.You can change the style of the gridlines to be either a solid, dashed or dotted line.

Make a “Rule-of-Thirds" Grid

You can adjust the grid options to display the Rule-of Thirds over your image.

To do that, change the settings to show gridlines every 100 percent with 3 subdivisions.

Using Grids In Photoshop
Using Grids In Photoshop

Snap To Grid

The Snap To function in Photoshop and Photoshop Elements is useful when you are trying to align objects or create precise selections. When Snap To is enabled, the edge of objects that you move or selections that you create will jump to align to the closest marker that you are snapping to. You can set the program to snap to grid lines, guidelines, layers and/or the document boundary.

To access the Snap To settings, do one of the following.

In Photoshop:

Select View>Snap To. This will allow you to select the marker that you want to snap to:

Using Grids In Photoshop

You can select any or all of these markers and Photoshop will snap to the nearest.

You can also turn all snapping on or off using the View>Snap toggle or by using the keyboard shortcut Shift+Cmd+; (on a Mac) or Shift+Ctrl+; (on a PC)

Using Grids In Photoshop

Remember that the Snap toggle has to be turned on for the Snap To feature to work.

In Photoshop Elements:

Select View>Snap To from the top menu bar. When you do, a sub-menu will open where you will be able to choose the marker or markers that you want to snap to:

Using Grids In Photoshop

You can select any or all of these and Elements will snap to the closest.

Sometimes You'll Need To Turn Snapping Off

Sometimes Snap To can be a pain.

There are times when the Snap To feature can be really helpful and there are times when it just gets in your way by making it difficult to move an object into the correct position.

If you find that's the case, you can disable the feature by choosing View>Snap To and then de-selecting Grid from the Snap To submenu. If you are working in Photoshop, you can also disable all snapping by clicking on View and then clicking on Snap to toggle it off or, alternatively, by using the keyboard shortcut Shift+Cmd+; (on a Mac) or Shift+Ctrl+; (on a PC).

Or you can temporarily disable Snap in either Photoshop or Elements by holding down the Control key as you move an object or create a selection.




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