Sharing Greeting Cards Created In Photoshop Elements

December 15, 2015

Sharing Greeting Cards Created In Photoshop Elements

In our last post we looked at creating greeting cards using the tools in Photoshop Elements. And we found out how fast and easy it is to create a personalized photo greeting card.

But what do you do after you've created your card? What's the next step? How do you share your new creation?

In this post, we'll look at options for outputting a card created in Photoshop Elements

Print The Card Using Your Home Printer

You can print your greeting card right at home, using your home printer.

To print your greeting card on your local printer, start by clicking on the Print icon at the bottom of the interface.

sharing cards in photoshop elements

This will open the Print dialog box. Here you will specify your print options.

These options will depend on your computer operating system, the printer model and the type and size of paper you're printing on. So I can't really help with specifics for this step. But I can suggest that you practice printing out your card using everyday letter paper and only move to the more expensive card stock after you've perfected the process.

Have Your Cards Commercially Printed

If you have created your card in one of the size/layout options that are Shutterfly compatible (See my previous post, Creating Greeting Cards In Photoshop Elements, for more information on this.) you can order commercial prints of the card directly from within Elements.

To start this process, click on the Order icon at the bottom of the interface.

sharing cards in photoshop elements

This will open a window where you can sign up for a Shutterfly account or sign in if you already have one. You will need to have an account in order to use this service.

sharing cards in photoshop elements

And from there, you can order your prints.

Share As a JPG

Once you are finished working on your card, you can export it to share it as a JPG file.

To do this, choose File>Export Card from the top menu bar. This will open a dialog box where you can choose to export the card as either a JPG, a TIFF or as a PDF file.

sharing cards in photoshop elements

While this is a quick and easy option for sharing your greeting card in a digital way, keep in mind that this process will produce a different jpeg for each page of your card.

That means that if you export a flat greeting card, the export will produce a single JPG file. But if you have created a traditional, folded greeting card, exporting the card as a JPG will produce three JPG files. So, practically speaking, sharing a greeting card as an exported JPG is probably best limited to flat, single page cards.

Save As And Share The Card As A PDF File

We talked options for saving your greeting card creation in my previous post, Creating Greeting Cards In Photoshop Elements. One of those options is to save a copy of the card as a PDF file.

To save a card as a PDF file, choose File>Save As form the top menu bar. Then choose Acrobat PDF in the Format drop down box towards the bottom of the dialog box.

sharing cards in photoshop elements

Saving a greeting card as a PDF creates a file that can be shared with and viewed by pretty much anyone with a computer, not just those who have Photoshop Elements.

The PDF file created in this process can be a sizable one. Depending on the number of photos and the graphics on your card, the associated PDF file can be anywhere from 2.5 to 3.5 MB in size. So keep that in mind if you are planning on emailing your cards in the PDF format. That size really shouldn't be a problem with most email servers, but keep an eye out for returned messages just in case one of your recipients has a too-full mailbox.




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