Photographing Cities and Places

February 27, 2013

Photographing Cities and Places

As much as I’ve always loved photographing nature and nature photography, I’m always stuck by the wonderful images that you can take in more urban settings – city and downtowns, buildings and bridges, even street signs and the like.

digital photography traffic

City photography, sometimes called location photography, is fun because it allows for so many different types of subjects:

  • Architecture. Building and bridges can make great photographic subjects. And be sure to keep a watchful eye out for interesting and unique architectural styles, especially when photographing older structures.
  • Cityscapes. Landscape images of city skylines can be fun to photograph. Don’t forget the wide-angle lens.
  • People. Last but not least, don’t forget to photograph people. Candid street photography can produce images that tell the history of the city and it’s inhabitants. And photographing people in urban settings can exist in can make for a powerful study city life. By the way, it’s always a good idea to get someone’s permission before snapping his or her picture.

The one issue that many people have with photographing in an urban setting is the sometimes overwhelming amount of greyness and angular hardness—the concrete streets and sidewalks, the steel architecture and rigid outlines of bridges and buildings —that’s everywhere in a city setting. But I think it helps if you can see the beauty is this very man-made world. I can.

For Further Reading…

Photo Gallery: How to Take Photos of Cities — National Geographic

The 5 F’s: Street photography tips. John Free

Urban & City Photography: 70 Dramatic Examples

Location Photography: How to Comprehensively Capture a City, Village or Street

10 Tips for Urban Photography




Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Our Blog

Creative Exposure Part Nine: More on ISO
Creative Exposure Part Nine: More on ISO

July 22, 2017

We've seen how managing the ISO setting allows you to control the amount of grain that shows in your photos. But it does more than that. Understanding and working with the ISO setting gives us added flexibility in terms of setting the other two exposure settings–aperture and shutter speed.

The bottom line is that ISO is an important and useful tool, and one that you will want to be comfortable with if you are looking to take creative control of your exposure.

Continue Reading

Creative Exposure Part Eight: Understanding ISO
Creative Exposure Part Eight: Understanding ISO

July 12, 2017

ISO–which stand for International Standards Organization–is the third point on the exposure triangle and it represents the sensitivity of the camera’s image sensor to light.

Continue Reading

Creative Exposure Part Seven: More on Aperture and Depth of Field
Creative Exposure Part Seven: More on Aperture and Depth of Field

July 02, 2017

Understanding aperture and how it affects depth of field is one of the most important concepts to learn in photography because it has such a big impact on your images.

Continue Reading