Digital Photography Tip: Viewfinder vs. LCD

May 05, 2013

Digital Photography Tip: Viewfinder vs. LCD

LCD screens, the tiny little screens on the back on most cameras sold today are handy little devices for viewing your images. And, many folks also find these screen handy for framing their shots too because, well they’re there and they’re nice and big and because the LCD screen shows the entire scene that you’ll be capturing with your shot (most viewfinders only show about 90%-95%) of the scene.

digital photography LCD

But the advantages of using the viewfinder (and, therefore, looking for a model that has a viewfinder when you are shopping for a camera) far outweigh the convenience of using the LCD:

  • Using the viewfinder reducing the chances of camera blur.

    Snapping your shot when you are holding the camera out at arm’s length introduces a lot of movement into your image. Your camera will be much more steady and stable if you use the viewfinder because when you do that, you have the camera up close to your body, your center of mass, and have it pressed against your face. The result is significantly less camera shake and, therefore, a sharper image.

  • The scene in the viewfinder is brighter and easier to see than that on the LCD, especially in bright light

    LCD screen are notoriously difficult to use in bright light because of the glare on the screen. In really bright conditions you may only be able to see the bright reflection of the sun on the screen. You won’t have this problem if you use the viewfinder.

  • LCD screens drain your battery. Quickly.

    LCD screens are major power hogs. So using the LCD screen constantly to frame your shots will quickly drain your battery. And, the larger the LCD screen, the more battery power it uses and the quicker you’ll be without juice.

  • You can’t really judge an image from the LCD screen

    No matter how good you camera’s LCD screen is, you can’t rely on it to give you an accurate depiction of your images. Photos viewed on an LCD screen often look brighter than they actually are. And, even the largest LCD screen can only give you a general idea of the details of an image. So don’t delete photos based on the view in the LCD screen.
    Deleting images one-by-one is harder on your memory card. Deleting the images all at once after you’ve downloaded them to your computer will lengthen the life of your card.




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